Kim Moore

Kim Moore

Glasgow based composer and all-round creative Kim Moore has worked across a variety of platforms. From her time with Zoey Van Goey to Team Effort, a project led by producer Gilly Roche, Moore's practice reflects her own free-spirited nature, so often endeavouring to expand her own skill set by collaborating with others. Following the release of Black Rabbit under the pseudonym WOLF, we discussed her work and decision to donate all the proceeds from the single to charity and found out what lies ahead for the rest of 2016.

How would you best 'label' your creative practice to those unfamiliar with your work? Would you describe yourself as a musician, an artist, a performer...or something in-between?

My creative practice falls in something in-between...It shifts and changes, I work with sound at the heart of all I do. I record music in my home studio, working with electronic music and composing with dots on page, I perform in a live music context under the name WOLF and on stage in theatre/dancetheatre productions as a musician, I create installation work, audio walks and I'm also taking on a more curator role starting a record label.

ICEPOLE WITH KATY WILSON

ICEPOLE WITH KATY WILSON

Would you consider yourself to have a collaborative ethos in your practice? and if so, what do you think this adds to your art?

I think I always prefer a collaborative making process, conversations are important to me, dialogues in the work and with different people, playing and experimenting, throwing ideas into a space and letting that idea be reshaped or ripped apart by someone else, sometimes it can make a process harder, but I don't think it is a bad thing, if it was always easy I would be bored, you might just 'make do' and I'm scared of getting stuck doing the same thing, trapped in a ball of lethargic 'okayness'.

Reflection and research time is a really important part of how I make and give space for new ideas. I'm not very fast, I'm not great at creatively multitasking, ideas take a while to form and grow, recording and composing in my home studio leads to long periods of time spent alone, which is needed but often can lead to an unhealthy hermit like existence, through collaboration I think you learn when you need to take things to someone else to let them grow, at some point these ideas will always end up with an audience, which can then become a form of collaboration in itself as it works its way back into developing the work further. Importantly, through working with other artists on projects I'm getting a bit better at finishing things and I hope better at listening too. I'm hugely inspired by choreography and by art I see and experience, I think about composing in a very physical and visual way and this is informed and shaped by these collaborative experiences, the work, the insight into different artistic processes, and the people.

Where there any deciding factors or influences that motivated you to pursue a life in the arts? And with the creative arts being such a densely packed and competitive environment for young people, how did you find the opportunities and interest in your projects in the first place?

I'm not sure there was a deciding factor, I guess I didn't really have anything else that I was 'good' at, even then I didn't get great marks in music at school, I gave up on doing grades, I hated being judged for something I loved. The education system did nothing to encourage a love for music. It was the playing outside school hours with friends, with orchestras, having great instrument teachers that inspired a love of playing, seeing performances, and parents who encouraged our interests in dance, music, art. After school I remember looking at anthropology and cultural studies courses as well as music, I've always been interested in people, why we live the ways we do, how societies and cultures inform, control or shape our individual choices, I think this is still something I'm exploring now in writing.

Glasgow though really has been the biggest influence and motivation though, the people I've met, the work I've seen, been part of, the conversations, the people, the city. There is an openness here, this is a city where you can experiment, try and fail and you won't be judged, there are always hands and arms underneath you if you fall. Playing with Zoey Van Goey was incredible and the confidence builder and space for a lot of learning that I could create music and ideas and perform music for an audience.

I think building relationships with people is the most important thing. Being authentic in your reasons to create something and with someone, approaching artists who's work you admire for a chat regardless of any outcome. I think you have to plan also, you need to be very organised with looking ahead, managing your time day to day and monthly, yearly, this allows freedom and space for ideas and security of knowing you can earn enough money to pay your rent etc and have room to make work and new ideas. I think never presuming that there will always be projects and work in the future is important too, working hard, keeping active in continuing to learn, always looking out for things, but also remembering to spend time on what is in front of you, the ideas and making space to play, I always have a recording device or notebook with me, it's become a habit and security blanket, it means where ever I am at anytime I can record an idea on audio or paper, It even comes to bed with me. 

Tell us about your latest release, Black Rabbit, and your decisions to donate the money raised from this single to charity.

Black Rabbit was the first more fully formed song I had written for a while, I recorded a live version in Banff Canada on residence there last year, I met some incredible musicians and engineers who recorded it with me there. I wanted to release it to mark the end of that period of my life, the remix was a present for my birthday from one of the engineers in Banff, so it felt like a good pairing to release the two. It's available until the end of January and all proceeds from downloads will go to The Prince and Princess of wales hospice. It was suggested as a charity to me from someone I love very much, they sounded pretty inspiring hearing what they did for people and families.

SPROG ROCK WITH KATY WILSON

SPROG ROCK WITH KATY WILSON

What is ahead for you in 2016?

I am working on a few pieces for theatre, a new work with AJ Taudevin: a one woman monologue with live band, working with musicians Julie Eisentein and Susan Bear from Tuff Love. I'll perform in a new work by Robert Softley Gale with music composed by Scott Twynholm. I'm working with Jenna Watt on a piece as sound designer. Later in the year I'll start development on a project with a dance company and poet based in North England, which I'll perform in as well. I'm also looking to start working in a recording studio with some young people in north east Glasgow on different recording projects they want to do. I'm also starting a new record label called ICOSA Records which is slowly finding it's home through a lot of talking, planning and working with some visual artists. WOLF is going through some changes and I'll be working on new material, I have some gigs, 29th February supporting Adem at the Hug and Pint and then 20th March supporting Adam Staffords album launch also at the Hug and Pint.

Black Rabbit by WOLF is available to download here - https://thisiswolfmusic.bandcamp.com/
All proceeds donated from the downloads will be given to The Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice in Glasgow. 

For more information on Kim's work and projects visit her website http://www.kimikomoore.com/

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Ulla Schildt